Daybreak, 1922: Canvas Replica Painting: Large
By artist Maxfield Parrish (1870-1966), in a Private Collection
Regarded as the most popular art print in history, this piece was, most remarkably, displayed in one of every four American homes of the 1920s. In a fantastical idyllic setting, two figures bend towards each other in the sun-dappled mist of a covered portico. Parrish helped shape the Golden Age of illustration with his frequent commissions of children's books and popular magazines. He lived comfortably from the royalties brought in by posters, calendars and other works addressing his images. Parrish painted well into his ninety first year. The authentic stretched canvas replica painting captures the original work's texture, depth of color, and even its bold brushstrokes, which are applied by hand exclusively for Design Toscano. The imported, delicately carved hardwood frame boasts a delicate leaf motif with fine feathered detailing finished in antique gold tones.
Large: 40.5"Wx27"H. framed (32.5"Wx19"H. image size, 4"W. frame)
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   Maxfield Parrish (1870-1966)

Maxfield Parrish was an American painter and illustrator who was possibly the most popular commercial artist in the United States during the first half of the 20th century. He designed posters, magazine covers, books and advertising illustrations and even painted murals. Parrish is best known for his fantasy landscapes featuring attractive young women. Parrish's meticulous attention to detail and natural backgrounds, as well as unusual use of color gave his illustrations and paintings an almost dreamlike, idyllic ambiance.

After entering the artistic career professionally, Parrish helped shape the Golden Age of illustration in American visual arts. A recurring theme in Parrish's paintings was androgynous nudes with fantastical landscapes. Parrish's paintings were revolutionary in several ways. For one, he did not adhere to one style. Second, his use of dazzling colors were achieved by glazing, in which Parrish would alternately apply layers of oil separated by a varnish on a monochromatic first layer.

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